Have you met…Karen Baumeister?


Whites of Gray, Yellow, Red, 60 x 60 inches, 2013

Whites of Gray, Yellow, Red, 60 x 60 inches, 2013

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Karen Baumeister.

Pink II, 2011

Karen Baumeister, Pink II, 2011

BIOGRAPHY
1962    Born Philadelphia, PA
2006    Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Certificate (Four Year), Merit Scholarship Award
2008    Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, MFA
Lives in Huntingdon Valley, PA
Pink 64 x 68 inches

Karen Baumeister, Pink 64 x 68 inches

Process

Karen Baumeister

“My work is color-based focusing on the most fundamental aspects of color and light.

Seemingly monochromatic at first glance, upon closer investigation two or more hues are revealed.

Each painting is developed through its own specific rigorous process. Acrylic paint as pure fluid, heavy body and mixed color, is applied in alternate layers upon stretched raw linen or canvas. The paint stroke vertical and/or horizontal or both, provides a texture appropriate to its color and becomes a vehicle in which to hold and release a specific visual resonance.

Cloud formations, weather conditions and daylight moving into dusk activate each painted layer to a particular pitch or color/light interaction. Each layer interdependent upon the next is scrutinized for a specific visual tone to occur through color and brush stroke as the paintings respond to natural light.

The realization of the physical presence of a painting is a continuance of an exploration of a developing form of art and for me a lifelong ambition to achieve it.” KB

Karen Baumeister, Everchanging, 2010, 8 x 9 inches.

Karen Baumeister, Everchanging, 2010, 8 x 9 inches.

Other material relating to Karen Baumeister.

Artist blog: kbaumeister.blogspot.ca

Steven Alexander Journal: Karen Baumeister

Facebook Page: Karen Baumeister

Left Bank Art Blog: In And Around  Monochrome.

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Have you met…Judith Farr?


"Spongy" gouache on A3 paper

“Spongy” gouache on A3 paper

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Judith Farr.

"Bow" gouache on paper

“Bow” gouache on paper

Judith Farr (London, 1981) expresses herself through her paintings; a few years ago she started making abstract investigations so as to develop her own visual language. This year she’s begun an MFA at the Open College for the Arts (UK) in order to continue exploring and expanding on her practice.She uses a combination of automatic drawing, colour, patterns and textures to explore her subconscious, often with a touch of humour.

‘I use my subconscious to investigate painting and drawing, it acts as a narrative that allows me to create images. I try to break my own self imposed rules and surprise myself. I explore the conflict between the need to control an outcome and the desire to let go, and therein I find the unexpected.’

She is currently living in Catalonia, Spain with her partner and daughter.

    • "Basket" gouache on A3 paper

      “Basket” gouache on A3 paper

      "Wave" (reworked) gouache on A3 paper

      “Wave” (reworked) gouache on A3 paper

Other material relating to Judith Farr.

Artist website: judithbryonyfarr.me

Blog: judithbryonyfarr.me/#02a/wordpress

Studio Critical: Judith Farr

Proto Gallery: Judith Farr

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

Have you met…Diane Scott?


Down a Thin Thread, 2012 Acrylic, aluminium 600 x 600 mm

Down a Thin Thread, 2012
Acrylic, aluminium
600 x 600 mm

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Diane Scott.

Diane Scott lives in Auckland New Zealand.

Pointing to the Grey, 2013 Acrylic, aluminium 800 x 800 mm

Pointing to the Grey, 2013
Acrylic, aluminium
800 x 800 mm

Education

2011-2012

Master of Fine Arts (First Class Honours) Elam School of Fine Arts University of Auckland Under

the supervision of Gavin Hipkins, Allan Smith and Gwynneth Porter

2007-2011

Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland

Leave Your Order, 2013 Acrylic, enamel, polymer, aluminium 400 x 400 mm

Leave Your Order, 2013
Acrylic, enamel, polymer, aluminium
400 x 400 mm

“Diane Scott explores the tensions that exist between image and object, and questions the hierarchies of the elements that comprise painting through the jumping of the image to material and from surface to void. Examining how an abstract painting can function as an object you see but also in what that object makes visible through process, materiality and sensation.

Scott is interested in producing work that simultaneously questions and withholds, and how this resistance to translation is a vital part of an artworks enigma. Through the oscillation of surface to abyss, material to image and the works simultaneously reacting to light, the viewers reflection and architecture, the works function atmospherically, anchoring them in the ‘now’ of experience, yet still speaking to the concerns of Russian Suprematism and Malevich’s Black Square. Elements within the works recede and advance as the viewer navigates around, illusion and materiality merge and the surface of the work becomes hard to locate.

Scott’s current works are a response to Donald Judd’s idea that two of the most important elements in art are colour and space and that they are invisible. So the aim to separate the colour from the support led to Scott’s yellow halo’s behind the work’s where the viewer can see the colour but not the paint. This deferral of colour to located on or anchored to a support, elevates the support and it’s surface to object, in doing so this activates the colour to the architecture, and also allows colour to occupy real space. The Aluminium material supports are hand sanded back to explore how the material’s plane can oscillate from surface to abyss, some are painted and then wiped/sanded in a series of layers.

Scott has painted the works yellow because we don’t physically see yellow with our eyes; the cones in our eyes have receptors for red, blue and green, all other colours are perceived and read by our brain interpreting the amount of overlap of those colours. Yellow is also the colour that visually travels forward the most, and it’s the colour we are most likely to remember. Pigments are light refracting material which reflect, refract and absorb light. Pigments aren’t where the colour resides. Light is colour, pigment is shape, the works attempts to make visible colour, space and material.

Prior to studying at Elam School of Fine Arts, Scott’s art practice was primarily sculptural. This experience informs the current works.”

All Things Being Equal, 2013 Enamel, aluminium 417 x 417 mm

All Things Being Equal, 2013
Enamel, aluminium
417 x 417 mm

Other material relating to Diane Scott.

Artist website: dianescott.net

Art Orbiter artist studios: Diane Scott 

Celeste. Network: Diane Scott

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