Have you met…Eliot Markell?


Spin Cycle Salvaged beach rope, tissue paper, gauze mesh. 36"x42"x2" Installation for Best Case Scenario, Brooklyn Fire Proof, 2014

Spin Cycle
Salvaged beach rope, tissue paper, gauze mesh. 36″x42″x2″ Installation for Best Case Scenario, Brooklyn Fire Proof, 2014

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist. I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to. The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Eliot Markell.

Whirligig 2014, oil paint, tissue paper, beeswax, on extruded plaster, lobster trap brackets, and salvaged beach rope.

Whirligig
2014, oil paint, tissue paper, beeswax, on extruded plaster, lobster trap brackets, and salvaged beach rope.

ART EDUCATION:

1979-80 Empire State College, SUNY., BPS. fine arts.

1973-74 Gandy Brodie School of Fine Arts, Newfane, VT.

1971-73 Mark Hopkins College, Brattleboro, VT.

Red Grid 2014, oil paint and beeswax on extruded plaster, with driftwood frame. 11"x8.5"

Red Grid
2014, oil paint and beeswax on extruded plaster, with driftwood frame. 11″x8.5″

Artist Statement

“What differentiates painting and sculpture from décor, and how is it decided which takes precedence?Perhaps that distracting dichotomy lies in the nature of visual cognition; what you see is what you get, or if I may be so presumptuous; at least what the salon provides for perceptual priorities.You are what you’re used to eating.More adventurous artistic endeavors may seem anathema to the essentially ornamental purpose of pampered decoration meant to embellish an otherwise dreary environment.But then again unencumbered mark making was good enough for the cavemen at Lascaux. (talk about site specific!)

That the purely pretty alone should suffice for art collecting in the modern cave does not add up in my mind. Like the cavemen, I make art that might not be matchy matchy with the sofa, but will wreak its own elegantly iconoclastic version of interior design.

I hope this doesn’t sound like unmitigated hubris or egotistical posturing. I’m just going on my own sense of historical precedence. My work has always been about my own limitations.

I’ve never been a virtuoso; just a grind-it-out, seat-of-my-pants kind of artist. I prefer the hands-on ethic of vigorous, yet nuanced craft that proposes an interpretative aesthetic.

With my work, what you see depends on how thoroughly you look. Recognition of merit in the unfamiliar requires patience and perseverance.

I’ve built my oeuvre based on decades of cumulative momentum. The more I’ve stuck with it the more accomplished I’ve become at enveloping my art in a substantive mixture embodying textured layers of sensuous psyche and physical pulsation.

Chroma and atmosphere saturate my painting, imbuing compositions with an expansive spatial perspective. Loose pigment is coupled with tightly drafted, curvilinear edifices lending a formal element to the picture plane.

This painterly philosophy encompasses my neo representational “Mainescape” plein air works on paper to rough-hewn “Beach Rope” sculptures who’s principle ingredients are salvaged lobstering gear and driftwood from the shores of downeast Maine.

These multi-hued tangles of knotted beach rope are cleaned, sorted and applied to driftwood in a congruent manner. The laborious process of wrapping, gluing and stapling satisfy a fundamental urge to physically assemble a combination of man-made and natural detritus. The variety of beach rope’s weathered palette, layered onto lengths of driftwood compliment my painted images chromatically, and refer to African and outsider sources. These sculptures suggest an implicit virility rooted in figurative association.

With stenciling I’ve found there’s an “automatic” quality to painting in or around a physical boundary such as tape. When the intricate web of tape is removed it reveals unexpectedly energetic trails of pigment criss-crossing the surface. Such a process-oriented approach instigates a lively dialogue with my freehand marks, and corresponds metaphorically to my fascination with the micro/macro aspects of quantum and cosmological poetry.

The landscape in my art manifests largely through my “Mainescape”, watercolor and oil pastel works on paper and panel. Done mostly in and around Acadia National Park in Maine, these pieces are immersed in the immediacy of atmospheric effect, the oceanic tableau, and rugged rocky coastline.

This intimacy with nature has invigorated and informed my studio oil paintings. Although the plein air works tend to be more traditionally representational, the paintings more muscular gestures distill the representation of nature into an elemental yet ethereal montage.

So ultimately what should a discriminating eye be focusing on?

I enjoy eye candy on the 4th of July as much as the next kid, but when it comes to an enduring investment I go for a more in-depth sense of pictorial integrity and authentic artistic identity.

And I think that it looks good on the wall.” EM

Not The Foggiest 2013 Oil on panel 15"x12"

Not The Foggiest
2013 Oil on panel 15″x12″

Conjured Fog 2013 Oil on panel 19.75"x33"

Conjured Fog
2013 Oil on panel 19.75″x33″

Other material relating to Eliot Markell.

Artist website: eliotmarkell.com

White Elephant On Wheels: Eliot Markell

P.S.1 Studio Visit: Eliot Markell

Art In New York City: Eliot Markell

ArtSlant: Eliot Markell

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Have you met…Vincent Lardieri?


Untitled (Earth-Sherbet), 2014, Foam, clear gesso, steel nuts, bolts, washers, and rods on linen, 17.25(H) x 14(W) x 2.25(D)

Vincent Lardieri, Untitled (Earth-Sherbet), 2014, Foam, clear gesso, steel nuts, bolts, washers, and rods on linen, 17.25(H) x 14(W) x 2.25(D)

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist. I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to. The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Vincent Lardieri.

Stainless Slit, 2011, Acrylic, stainless steel nut, bolt and washers, 7(H) x 9(W) x 4(D)

Vincent Lardieri, Stainless Slit, 2011, Acrylic, stainless steel nut, bolt and washers, 7(H) x 9(W) x 4(D)

EDUCATION

2012MFA – Savannah College of Art & Design – Savannah, Georgia

2003BFA – Florida State University – Tallahassee, Florida

2001AA – Palm Beach State College – Palm Beach Gardens, Florida

Untitled (Lunar-Berry-Bronzite), 2014, Foam, duct tape, acrylic, steel nuts, bolts, washers, and rods on canvas, 12.5(H) x 14(W) x 2(D)

Vincent Lardieri, Untitled (Lunar-Berry-Bronzite), 2014, Foam, duct tape, acrylic, steel nuts, bolts, washers, and rods on canvas, 12.5(H) x 14(W) x 2(D)

STATEMENT: 

“My work can sometimes be considered “paint-centric”, however, medium specificity is not the primary concern in every artwork. Purely traditional and serial practices are banal, so I exercise an “anything goes” mentality with materials and techniques, but clash them with standard fine art elements, resulting in an anticipated relevancy and reinvigoration.

Most of the work exists in a limbo state – operating as both paintings and sculptures (and oftentimes multi-media amalgamations) – but also being none of these (because they are not definitively one or the other). The metamodern case for “both – neither” fits my work in that I refuse the pigeonhole, allowing for it to remain in a limbo state, where what specifically results is always up for debate.” VL

Lime-Levitation-Landslide, 2014, Acrylic, duct tape, and wood on canvas, 7.25(H) x 7.5(W) x 3.75(D)

Vincent Lardieri, Lime-Levitation-Landslide, 2014, Acrylic, duct tape, and wood on canvas, 7.25(H) x 7.5(W) x 3.75(D)

Other material relating to Vincent Lardieri.

Artist website: vincentlardieri.com

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

Have you met…Alex Paik?


Right Triangle 2 gouache, colored pencil, paper 26 x 6 x 3 inches 2014

Right Triangle 2
gouache, colored pencil, paper
26 x 6 x 3 inches
2014

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Alex Paik.

Parallelogram 1 gouache, colored pencil, paper 17 x 15 x 1.5 inches 2013

Parallelogram 1
gouache, colored pencil, paper
17 x 15 x 1.5 inches
2013

b. 1981 Oxnard, California. Lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.
EDUCATION
2005: M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania
2003: B.F.A. with honors in Art, Pennsylvania State University

V 1 gouache, colored pencil, paper 14 x 10 x 3 inches 2013

V 1
gouache, colored pencil, paper
14 x 10 x 3 inches
2013

“My first serious introduction to art was through classical music as a violinist playing in various community orchestras during high school. That experience stayed with me as I made the transition to the visual arts later in college. I’ve always been attracted to the ethereal abstraction of music and the way that music can be simultaneously cerebral and personal, especially in the contrapuntal music of Bach.

My paper assemblages mimic the way that the voices of a fugue are continuously repeated, transposed, inverted, and folded into themselves. Each piece focuses on one unit as its subject which is then repeated in different configurations as the piece grows. I use repetition not so much as a compositional device, but more as a way to explore and maximize the possibilities of the unit.

Maybe if Paul Klee, Thomas Nozkowski, Frank Stella, and Richard Tuttle were the Lost Boys on Never Land and grew up on video games, classical music, and indie pop, this is what they would make. Or maybe they would focus on fighting pirates.” AP

Prelude and Fugue (Cootie) gouache, marker, colored pencil, paper 7 x 6 x 4 inches 2012

Prelude and Fugue (Cootie)
gouache, marker, colored pencil, paper
7 x 6 x 4 inches
2012

Other material relating to Alex Paik.

Artist website: alexpaik.com

PS1 Studio Visit: Alex Paik

Structure and Imagery: Alex Paik

bmore art: Alex Paik

Youtube: Alex Paik

Two Coats of Paint: Alex Paik

If you liked this introduction check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

 

Have you met…Tom Duimstra?


Tom Duimstra, Rood En Blauw

Tom Duimstra, Rood En Blauw

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Tom Duimstra.

Tom Duimstra

Tom Duimstra

Born 1951, Grand Rapids, Mi.
Studied at University of California at Berkeley.
Exhibiting work nationally and internationally since 1979.

Tom Duimstra

Tom Duimstra

“I was born an artist. It’s all I know. Sometimes I feel that perhaps my work is about nothing. But isn’t nothing, something?” TD

Tom Duimstra

Tom Duimstra

Other material relating to Tom Duimstra.

Artist website: tomduimstra.com

Art Hack: Tom Duimstra

Gallerie Art Haus: Tom Duimstra

Michael D Willis: Tom Duimstra

ArtSlant: Tom Duimstra

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

Have you met…Douglas Witmer?


...not a statement.

…not a statement.

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Douglas Witmer.

Tonight We Do, 2013. Black gesso and acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.  ( 2 / 18 )

Tonight We Do, 2013.
Black gesso and acrylic on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
( 2 / 18 )

Douglas Witmer was born in 1971 in Winchester, VA and raised in Lancaster County, PA. He has lived and worked in Philadelphia since 1995.

Education

2001 M.F.A., The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia
1993 B.A., Goshen College, Indiana

School Papers, mixed media on found school-grade writing paper. Dimensions variable, approx 9 x 6 inches ea.

School Papers, mixed media on found school-grade writing paper. Dimensions variable, approx 9 x 6 inches

“The School Papers is an ongoing series since 2004, now numbering nearly 100 individual works. In 2004 I saw Tantric drawings from India for the first time. They are made anonymously on irregularly shaped buff-colored paper surfaces. The scale is intimate and the imagery is flat and geometric. Within the Tantric tradition these works serve specific meditative purposes for both their creators and their viewers. Worlds away, and without any knowledge of the Tantric practice, I nevertheless connected immediately and profoundly with their visual energy. It’s an uncanny balance that feels precisely calibrated, yet simultaneously blunt and raw. These works made manifest possibilities I was exploring in my own work at the time. And I was deeply impressed by the idea that “pure” geometric imagery had an important “use” within a community.

In 2006 my father gave me a cache of vintage school grade writing paper he had found. The color of the old paper reminded me of the color of the Tantric drawings. One day I began layering upon this paper the simplest rectangular forms in black and white. Unexpected incidencts began to occur right away–tears, buckling, bleed-thru. But this paper had a way of receiving and transforming every kind of touch and material I put to it.

On this unique surface, with the sheet size and repetitive ruled lines serving as grounding constants, I explore a personal tactility and geometry in a contemplative mindset.” DW

Fruitville, mixed media on found wood. Less than 8" any direction.

Fruitville, mixed media on found wood. Less than 8″ any direction.

“Fruitville is the name for a body of work that has been ongoing since 2000, however individual works are undated. Work in this series is produced in intermittent spurts, often with years between.

The Fruitville Pike is a road where I grew up in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. It’s a major thoroughfare, but it doesn’t go to, from, or through anywhere called Fruitville. My efforts to find Fruitville, if there ever was such a place at all, have been inconclusive.

So Fruitville exists in my imagination as a kind of Eden; a place of purity, clarity, and quiet delight. It manifests itself in an ongoing visual process of experimentation with wood, paint, glue, paper, ink, light, and shadows. The things that make up my Fruitville exist to be in relationship to the places where they can be seen, and also in relationship with each other.”  DW

A full-length essay about the Fruitville series, by Chris Ashley, is available here
.

Fruitville, mixed media on found wood. Less than 8" any direction.

Fruitville, mixed media on found wood. Less than 8″ any direction.

Other material relating to Douglas Witmer.

Website: Douglas Witmer

Blog: Douglas Witmer

Facebook fan page: Douglas Witmer

The Art Blog.org: Douglas Witmer

Some Walls: Douglas Witmer

Thinking About Art: Douglas Witmer

Studio Critical: Douglas Witmer

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

Have you met…James Austin Murray?


Tamesis II, oil on canvas, 82″ x 54″ x4″, 2011

James Austin Murray, Tamesis II, oil on canvas, 82″ x 54″ x4″, 2011

An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist James Austin Murray.

Gravity Well, 96″ x 48″, oil on canvas, 2013

James Austin Murray, Gravity Well, 96″ x 48″, oil on canvas, 2013

Numinous Series 2013, 12″ x 12″, oil on canvas, 2013

James Austin Murray, Numinous Series 2013, 12″ x 12″, oil on canvas, 2013

Statement

“I paint because it is how I justify my life. Nothing else seems to hold up. I love paint, I love the smell of oil paint and the warm buttery consistency it has while it’s being pushed along by the brush. I read something from an artist once, that paint is just colored mud. Very true. It’s as ancient as humanity, yet still an important part of it. One of my interests is how we have changed since the beginning of humanity. It is just one interest that interconnects with the seemingly disparate other interests that make up my painting focus.

My current work is both about the paint and the light that reflects on and in it. I consider light to be a material I work with much like paint is a material I work with. If you spend time with one of my paintings you might find yourself thinking about the light in the room, with you and that painting. You might find yourself thinking about what the painting might do in a room with more or less natural light. If you did find yourself thinking these things maybe you’d find yourself thinking about the light as you walk on the street, or the light in your home.

It’ s possible that you might start to wonder how we are affected by the light in our lives. Clearly plants are affected by light. Some need much more to survive than others, some will let their leaves change colors and fall away for the winter. Many animals mate to the cycle of the moonlight.

Are we also very affected by light? I suspect we are. Not only are we affected by light but approximately one hundred years ago we changed everything about the light in our lives. With the social introduction of electric lights we changed how we live. We divorced ourselves from aeons of lights natural rhythms.

Human females used to ovulate around the same time of the month because they were all subjected to the same light. In fact menstruate is a word that is derived from the word month. A word that in many languages is synonymous with moon.

Today we experience light differently than most of human history. Even our daylight hours differ in that we don’t have a set time when the world will get dark. All we have to do is flick a few switches and our wold is full of light, not the flickering dim light of a candle but the fully bright almost daylight of electric lights.

Back to paint, it’s the way paint plays with light that my focus. I use black paint. Black absorbs the entire spectrum of visible light leaving the oil in the paint to reflect the light in the room. You might wonder if this is all the work is about and you’d be right to wonder. Light is just one element and a starting point.”

James Austin Murray

December 2, 2013

New York City

James Austin Murray, oil on canvas, 2013

James Austin Murray, oil on canvas, 2013

James Austin Murray, 2013

James Austin Murray, oil on canvas, 2013

Other material relating to James Austin Murray.

Artist website: jamesaustinmurray.com

Lyons Wier Gallery:  April 3rd 2014 – May 3rd 2014 James Austin Murray

Studio Critical: James Austin Murray

Vimeo, Damien Hirst Protest: James Austin Murray

Art Orbiter: James Austin Murray

Youtube: James Austin Murray

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.

Have you met…Carol E McMahon?


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An introduction can be a wonderful thing. You can meet interesting people, and make new friends. You can be introduced to your new favorite foods, books, music, or artist.

I’d like to introduce you to some of my favorite artists. Some of whom I’ve been familiar with for years, and others I’ve only recently been introduced to.

The person I’d like to introduce is the artist Carol E McMahon.

Carol McMahon, No Hat Trees, 2012, wood, fabric, acrylic, gesso, 17” x 7” x 5.5”

Carol McMahon, No Hat Trees, 2012, wood, fabric, acrylic, gesso, 17” x 7” x 5.5”

Born in Santa Paula, California

Education

Post–graduate Boston University College of Art 1966-1967, 1971

Boston University College of Art B.F.A. 1966

Installation shot of "Home Front"; Found wooden doll house, gesso and acrylic. 51" x 22" x 18". "Brewing Time Varies" seen in back.

Installation shot of “Home Front”; Found wooden doll house, gesso and acrylic. 51″ x 22″ x 18″. “Brewing Time Varies” seen in back.

“Sculptures, paintings, and assemblages explore home and family. Domestic objects are de-familiarized and accorded new relationships and narratives. A dollhouse inverted – books bound in paint  unreadable – stuffed animals dissected and re-purposed.”

Carol McMahon

Carol McMahon

Other material relating to Carol E McMahon.

Artist website: cemcmahon.com

Bromfield Gallery: Carol McMahon

Donna Ingemanson: Carol McMahon

If you liked this introduction please check out the PREVIOUS and NEXT.